Partner Spotlight: Cook Children’s Center for the Prevention of Child Maltreatment

One of the best parts about Safe Babies is the diverse community of partners coming together for our common goal. Today’s blog features the work of the Cook Children’s Center for Prevention of Child Maltreatment and Dr. Dyann Daley, who has been a force in spearheading initiatives to better outcomes for infants, children and their families. Recently I had the pleasure of discussing the Center’s participation in Safe Babies with Britt Bachman, the Center’s Program Manager. In addition to her two Master’s degrees and years of experience and training, Britt is a delightful individual full of life and passion for the population she serves.

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 Led by the Cook Children’s Health Care System, The Center for Prevention of Child Maltreatment’s innovative research with location-based predictive analytics for child maltreatment has identified small geographic areas in Fort Worth where children are at greater risk. The Center partners with Safe Babies by helping to connect partner organizations with these vulnerable communities so that prevention and intervention areas can be optimally focused to mitigate risk. Once abuse and neglect have occurred, the goal is to discover and promote interventions, services, and treatments that can be related to objective measures of improvement in child wellbeing. Britt shared with me that Judge Ellen Smith of the 323rd District Court invited the Center to bring their data-driven approach to the Safe Babies team.

 

Cook Children's Center for the Prevention of Child Maltreatment is promoting the safe sleep initiative to promote best practices for cosleeping with infants.

Cook Children’s Center for the Prevention of Child Maltreatment is promoting the safe sleep initiative to promote best practices for sleeping infants.

“Our goal is to prevent child maltreatment by changing the context that gives rise to risk so families stay together in the first place,” Britt tells me. “Once within the child welfare system, children remain at-risk for the life-long compromised health, social, and educational outcomes associated with adverse childhood experiences (ACEs). Currently, there is no reliable, reproducible way to mitigate risk and improve outcomes. More research is needed to connect objective measures of child wellbeing to service effectiveness.”